Kategóriák:
Mind

Szintetizátor, Hangmodul  Billentyűzet  Elektromos zongora  Orgona  

Szempler  Dobgép, dobmodul  Szekvenszer  SFX  

Kontroller  Modul, kiegészítő, bővítés  Egyéb  Midi eszköz  

Kísérőautomatikás szintetizátor  

Ace Top-1 
Ace Top-3 
Ace Top-5 
Ace Top-6 
Ace Top-7 
Ace Top-8 
Ace Top-9 
B-422 
GT7 
Multistrings SY-5 
PS-1000 Monosynth 
Rhytm 
Rhytm Ace FR-1 
Rhytm Ace FR-15 
Rhytm Ace FR-2L 
Rhytm Ace FR-3 
Rhytm Ace FR-6 
 
GYÁRTÓK
 
replica handbags
Access
Ace
Akai
Alesis
Aries Music
ARP
Arturia
Bitheadz
Bomb Factory

replica handbags

Buchla
Casio
Cheetah
Clavia
Conn
Cordovoxreplica handbags
Crumar
Doepfer
E-mu
EDP
Eko
ElectrixFifa Coins|
Electro Harmonics
Elektor Fifa Coins|
Elektron
Elektronika
Elgam
Elka
EML
EMS
Encore Electronics
Ensoniq
Estradin
Fairlight
Firstman
Formanta
Fruity Loops
Future Retro
GEM
GeoPhisPribor
Gleeman
GMEDIA Music
Hammond
IK Multimedia
Jen Electronica
JoMoX
JVC
Kaemi
Kawai
Kellar Bass System
Kenton
Keyfax
Keytek
Kinetic Sound
Kirovsky
Koblo
Korg
Krasniy Partizan
Kurzweil
Lel'
Linn
Lowrey Micro Genies
Luberetskiy
MAM
Marion
Mellottron
Melodia
Metasonix
Moog
Multivox
Murom
Mutronics
Native Instruments
North Press
Novation
Oberheim
Octave
OSC
Paia
Panasonic
Philips
PPG
PropellerheadFifa 15 Coins| Fifa 15 Coins| Fifa 15 Coins| Prosoniq
Quasimidi
Redsound
Rheem
Rhodes
RMIF
Roland
RSF
Seer Systems
Selma
Selmer
Sequential Circuits
Sherman
Siel
Steinberg
Steiner Parker
Studio Electronics
SyncerSoft
Synhouse
Syntecno
Synthesizers.com
Synton
TC Works
Technosaurus
Teisco
Univox
Vermona
Waldorf
Wayoutware
Welson
Weltmeister
Wiard
WMS
Wurlitzer
Yamaha
 
Ace
 

Ace Electronic Industry Inc (normally known as Ace Tone) was a division of Sakata Shokai Limited of Osaka, Japan. They produced a portable organ(the GT7) and several drum machines. There is a relevant connection between Hammond and Roland here somewhere, as AceTone products are too similar to Hammond and Roland products. The GT7 organ was a clone of the Hammond X5, and the Rhythm Ace FR-2L is a clone of the Auto-Rhythm from Hammond and rumour has it that AceTone became Roland. A further confusion set in because in the UK Ace Tone products were distributed by Bentley Pianos in Woodchester, Glos. who always stuck their badge on the products, and sometimes Ace Tone drum machines are known as the Bentley Rhythm Ace rather than the Ace Tone Rhythm Ace.

Ace Tone was the predecessor to Roland. They made quite a number of combo organs during the 60's, and are one of the more well-known combo organ brand names. They may also be related to Whitehall - look at the stop tabs on the TOP-5 and compare them to the Whitehall 6640 - they're almost identical. I understand that the vibrato on these is excellent.  Ace Tone also had a relationship with Hammond.  They were largely (or, perhaps entirely) responsible for the early portables, the X2 and X5.  You can read more about the history of Ace Tone at the Keyboard Museum. Here's some more historical info, as ferreted out by fellow Combonaut, Micke L: "First of all, Ace-tone was just a tradename used on the various electronical organs and NOT a company (although I read that back in 1974, Kakehashi re-marketed the Roland SH-3 monophonic synth under the Ace-tone name! so apparently he still owned the right to the name)

Ikutaro Kakehashi was not only the founder of Roland (in 1972), 12 years before that he'd already founded Ace Electronics Industries in Osaka. He was to be responsible for the development and design of the Ace-tone combo organs but eventually left the company in 1972 (the very same year he founded Roland). But before that, in 1968, he'd founded Hammond Japan, a joint-venture of his Ace Electronics and the Hammond International Company. From what I understand this company built and released the Ace-tone GT-7 portable organ as early as 1971, some 3-4 years before they built the Hammond X-5 organ for the Hammond company in the states! (which in fact would mean that the Hammond X-5 was sort of a "copy" of the GT-7 instead of the other way around...) but by then Kakehashi was running the huge Roland enterprise.

After Kakehashi had left Ace Electronics in '72, the firm continued to build organs and synths, though I don't know whether these as well were marketed under the Ace-tone name, but I don't think so."

According to Peter Forrest, the first AceTone organ was a spinet, with model number TO-1.  He suggests that perhaps "TO" stood for "Transistor Organ".   I'll take it one step further, and suggest that "TOP" stands for "Transistor Organ, Portable".  Sounds good, anyway.  The TOP models seem to be of two different families.  The TOP-3 was available as early as 1965.  The TOP-5, 7 and 8 look very similar, and probably came out shortly afterwards.  Then in 1968-69, the TOP-1 and TOP-9 were introduced.  The TOP-6 probably came out around the same time, but didn't appear in the 1969 brochure.

There was an Ace Tone TOP-1 in the movie "Godzilla and the Smog Monster".  It's in a Japanese hoedown (?!) scene.  (thanks, Jeffree, for this tidbit) And there might have been one in Alex's living room in the movie "A Clockwork Orange" (thanks to Barry for this one)

 



Kezdőlap | Cikkek | Fórum | Hirdetések | Kapcsolat 
© 2004 Leon Creatives Budapest | Minden jog fenntartva